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image by Kristen (@creativekrissy) with caption : "Not all native women wear braids on the daily lol so this is a thought out loud ✨ #nativeartist #indigenousartist #abori" - 1693987761702160285
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Not all native women wear braids on the daily lol so this is a thought out loud ✨ #indigenouswomen

Eduardo Leal (@eduardoleal80) Instagram Profile Photo eduardoleal80

Eduardo Leal

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image by Eduardo Leal (@eduardoleal80) with caption : "#Repost from this week takeover of @opensocietyfoundations Instagram feed with my project "Cholita's Rise" ・・・
Estela Lo" - 1693941263873446970
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from this week takeover of @opensocietyfoundations Instagram feed with my project "Cholita's Rise" ・・・ Estela Loyaza (right) talks with A. Quispe, a fellow traffic warden in El Alto. Estela is one of the 15 “cholitas” who work as traffic wardens in the city. Since 2013, the municipality government has been hiring cholitas to control the chaotic traffic of the city. This is Eduardo Leal @eduardoleal80 sharing my long term project “Cholita’s Rise” about the emancipation of indigenous women in Bolivia. As recently as 10 years ago, Bolivia’s indigenous Aymara and Quechua women were socially ostracized and systematically marginalized. Known as “cholitas” (an initially derogatory term which members of the community have re-appropriated and now use with pride), these women—recognizable by their wide skirts, braided hair, and bowler hats—were banned from using public transportation or entering certain public spaces. Their career opportunities, meanwhile, were severely limited, with most becoming either housecleaners or roadside vendors. While these women have been organizing and advocating for their rights since at least the 1960s, their movement was invigorated by Evo Morales’s election, in 2006, as Bolivia’s first indigenous president. Ever since that historic moment, many of the country’s “cholitas” began taking pride in their traditional identity and further asserting their rights as members of Bolivia’s society. To see more from the project Cholita's Rise, go to: http://www.eduardoleal.co.uk/cholitas-rise/  Thanks! women

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Image by @kangelone with caption : "If food be thy medicine, then music is the medicine for your soul! Moved to tears in the @3rrrfm performance space today" at Triple R - 3RRR 102.7FM - 1693936916393406182

If food be thy medicine, then music is the medicine for your soul! Moved to tears in the @3rrrfm performance space today by @kardajala_kirridarra - amazing women with important music and an important message 🖤💛❤️ #indigenouswomen

Open Society Foundations (OSF) (@opensocietyfoundations) Instagram Profile Photo opensocietyfoundations

Open Society Foundations (OSF)

image by Open Society Foundations (OSF) (@opensocietyfoundations) with caption : "A team of cholitas wrestle in El Alto’s sports complex. In July 2014, a group of cholitas decided to form their own wres" - 1693931548650061997
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A team of cholitas wrestle in El Alto’s sports complex. In July 2014, a group of cholitas decided to form their own wrestling association and organize their own events—despite Bolivian mainstream culture’s tendency to enforce a rigid understanding of traditional gender roles. Many of these women have found that their male romantic partners were threatened by female strength; but that doesn’t stop these women from doing what they love. This is Eduardo Leal @eduardoleal80 sharing my long term project “Cholita’s Rise” about the emancipation of indigenous women in Bolivia. As recently as 10 years ago, Bolivia’s indigenous Aymara and Quechua women were socially ostracized and systematically marginalized. Known as “cholitas” (an initially derogatory term which members of the community have re-appropriated and now use with pride), these women—recognizable by their wide skirts, braided hair, and bowler hats—were banned from using public transportation or entering certain public spaces. Their career opportunities, meanwhile, were severely limited, with most becoming either housecleaners or roadside vendors. While these women have been organizing and advocating for their rights since at least the 1960s, their movement was invigorated by Evo Morales’s election, in 2006, as Bolivia’s first indigenous president. Ever since that historic moment, many of the country’s “cholitas” began taking pride in their traditional identity and further asserting their rights as members of Bolivia’s society. To see more from the project Cholita's Rise, go to: http://www.eduardoleal.co.uk/cholitas-rise/  Thanks! women

The Paya Hupa Way (@thepayahupaway) Instagram Profile Photo thepayahupaway

The Paya Hupa Way

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⚜️Necklace and earring set! Made with green dentelia, beargrass, and crystals. Fit for a queen! 👑✨ women

YWCA Calgary (@ywcalgary) Instagram Profile Photo ywcalgary

YWCA Calgary

image by YWCA Calgary (@ywcalgary) with caption : "In 1952, girls weren’t allowed in the rodeo, so 11-year-old Linda Onespot-Shouting, a member of the Tsuut’ina Nation, di" - 1693919252594849230
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In 1952, girls weren’t allowed in the rodeo, so 11-year-old Linda Onespot-Shouting, a member of the Tsuut’ina Nation, didn’t tell officials that she was a girl and became the first female to ride in the @calgarystampede competing in the boys’ wild steer riding. . . #IndigenousWomen

2018 is bout Indigenous women, the question everyone should be asking is: what are you doing to support Native women this year? We’re excited to be serving the urban Indigenous community in NYC, especially our women. The American Indian Community House is working on exciting programs and projects. I will keep you posted as our team kicks off this new year to make our work for the people, for our women and girls! #indigenouswomen

Chef/Visual Art/Biochemistry (@mathilde_food_art) Instagram Profile Photo mathilde_food_art

Chef/Visual Art/Biochemistry

image by Chef/Visual Art/Biochemistry (@mathilde_food_art) with caption : "What I Do When You Don’t See Me. 
There is a strong sense of community in Ngabe women psyche, even if the culture is mor" - 1693902739182187287
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What I Do When You Don’t See Me. There is a strong sense of community in Ngabe women psyche, even if the culture is more tribal oriented at large. The common thought is that human development will happen because of woman empowerment and leadership. It is in big part the truth, but communities, villages, tribes are made of much more than just the will of the female gender. Human development is not a struggle unique to developing countries as it is often interpreted. Like in the western world Ngabe women's organizations, associations, movements need the moral, emotional and practical support of men in their communities and male support in general. I hope men in Bocas- and beyond- from all ranges of lives and ethnicities will stand up and embark in supporting the Ngabe women of Panama. It takes a “bold" spirit (in this case french man Fabrice) to sit down and extract the fiber from the Pita leaves :-) :-) #indigenouswomen

Instagram Image by Shelby (@shelbyliskphoto) with caption : "Kahehtoktha shows me a sample of one of the 42 species of bean seeds she has in her home. We’ve been spending a lot of t" at Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, Ontario - 1693895996033406733

Kahehtoktha shows me a sample of one of the 42 species of bean seeds she has in her home. We’ve been spending a lot of time looking at seeds and sitting by a warm fire chatting but I can’t wait for spring to see her garden and learn more. She is a walking embodiment of our kanyenkeha cultural knowledge and teachings: “I learned a lot of plants growing up because we were on the farm and because we were a lot on foot. You know, people travel a lot on ATV’s and things today. It’s different. Their feet are not touching the earth. They’re not looking down on the brambles and the things that they’re tripping upon in the same way, to connect them with the plants that are there. Sometimes I go out for a walk with the dogs and I just put different leaves in my pocket as I go along and then we make that into a tea, so you know it didn’t actually cost anything. And those same things, almost anybody could find in and around their yard on a regular basis. But you do have to take precautions and people need to be careful to show the plant its true respect and honour because if you don’t then you might get sick by picking the wrong thing. Our people, the Mohawk people, would actually talk to the plant that they were wanting to have interaction with. We were that respectful of the natural environment that we even spoke to the plant before we harvested it.”

Cayla Nimmo (@caynimm) Instagram Profile Photo caynimm

Cayla Nimmo

image by Cayla Nimmo (@caynimm) with caption : "Rashon Cisco looks back to his grandmothers house before he leaves with his mother, Valya, in Oak Springs Sunday. Valya’" - 1693870889063721447
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Rashon Cisco looks back to his grandmothers house before he leaves with his mother, Valya, in Oak Springs Sunday. Valya’s older sister Ariel went missing in July and her partial remains were discovered in October 2017. Valya was pregnant at the time her older sister went missing, “The hardest thing is knowing she’ll never get to meet [my daughter],” she says. Ariel was close to her nephew and younger siblings, they would often call her mom. Today Ariel’s mother and grandfather were among a group to meet with Vice President of the Navajo Nation Jonathan Nez regarding the epidemic of missing and murdered Navajos. I am so grateful to Ariel’s family for being so open with me as I work on this project. Her family’s love is palpable, as is their heartbreak. They are not alone.

Chef/Visual Art/Biochemistry (@mathilde_food_art) Instagram Profile Photo mathilde_food_art

Chef/Visual Art/Biochemistry

image by Chef/Visual Art/Biochemistry (@mathilde_food_art) with caption : "What I Do When You Don’t See Me. 
There is a strong sense of community in Ngabe women psyche, even if the culture is mor" - 1693859603609122838
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What I Do When You Don’t See Me. There is a strong sense of community in Ngabe women psyche, even if the culture is more tribal oriented at large. The common thought is that human development will happen because of woman empowerment and leadership. It is in big part the truth, but communities, villages, tribes are made of much more than just the will of the female gender. Human development is not a struggle unique to developing countries as it is often interpreted. Like in the western world Ngabe women's organizations, associations, movements need the moral, emotional and practical support of men in their communities and male support in general. I hope men in Bocas- and beyond- from all ranges of lives and ethnicities will stand up and embark in supporting the Ngabe women of Panama. It takes a “bold" spirit (in this case french man Fabrice) to sit down and extract the fiber from the Pita leaves :-) :-) #indigenouswomen

jade stevenson (@celestial.jade) Instagram Profile Photo celestial.jade

jade stevenson

It saddens the fuck out of me that I didn’t see this or even know about it until now, it also saddens me that I’ll never hear about a lot of stories like this due to many fellow women who stay quiet out of fear they won’t be heard or believed or that they’ll be judged.. Taking advantage of any human body for your own personal pleasure is fucking disgusting and you do not deserve to continue breathing. I don’t care how well off you are or who you are. If you are a silenced victim and have nobody to reach out to, or are scared to talk to someone you love.. Don’t be afraid to direct message me. I can guarantee you that you’ll have someone who believes and loves you. Someone who will listen and can guarantee I understand and have felt your pain. I never want a fellow woman to feel alone or broken by the hands of a pig. . . #indigenouswomen